Hyuro’s Giant Murals

WORDS Michaela Stehr IMAGES Hyuro


Argentinian-born street artist and illustrator Tamara Djurovic, aka Hyuro, has spent 2018 painting public artworks that interact with architecture across the globe.

Her larger-than-life murals can be seen in countries including the Netherlands, Brazil, Spain, Italy and Belgium, to name a few. She designs each piece to complement the buildings they are placed on and to work with the surrounding landscapes.

Many of her pieces omit recognisable features like faces, creating an air of anonymity and mystery. The majority of her work portrays women in soft neutrals and muted tones, a symbol of oppression and political turmoil.

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Detail… Heerlen, Netherlands 2018. The topic suggested for this project was about how we understand the concept of growth/ re-growth, subject which somehow was linked to the dificult past history of Heerlen in the late 1950, after the Golden years coalming ended due to competition from cheaper Polish and American coal and the discovery of natural gas. Coalmines were closed all together and a difficult period of economic re-adjustment started in Heerlen. Even today the city has not fully recovered from the loss of tens of thousands of Jobs. Using the Japanese art practice of repairing broken pottery as a metaphor of life, making the piece even more beautiful than the original, this wall speaks from a more personal perspective about these difficult issues, our sufferings, sorrows and wounds that we live with over time. Refers about the possibility of extracting a sense and deeper learning to recover and become even stronger from this experiences, understanding them as a possibility of growth and learning. To accept this opportunities as something valuable, as a gift that gives us life to transform us into something greater. Special thanks to Rafael Schacter who curated this project and to everyone who took part and helped during the process. Many thanks to Sanne from @streetartheerlen for her time and photos. xx

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Heerlen, Netherlands 2018. The topic suggested for this project was about how we understand the concept of growth/ re-growth, subject which somehow was linked to the dificult past history of Heerlen in the late 1950, after the Golden years coalming ended due to competition from cheaper Polish and American coal and the discovery of natural gas. Coalmines were closed all together and a difficult period of economic re-adjustment started in Heerlen. Even today the city has not fully recovered from the loss of tens of thousands of Jobs. Using the Japanese art practice of repairing broken pottery as a metaphor of life, making the piece even more beautiful than the original, this wall speaks from a more personal perspective about these difficult issues, our sufferings, sorrows and wounds that we live with over time. Refers about the possibility of extracting a sense and deeper learning to recover and become even stronger from this experiences, understanding them as a possibility of growth and learning. To accept this opportunities as something valuable, as a gift that gives us life to transform us into something greater. Special thanks to Rafael Schacter @approvedbypablo who curated this project and to everyone who took part and helped during the process. Many thanks to Sanne from @streetartheerlen for her time and photos. xx

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¨LÁrzdora¨- Cotignola, Italy 2018. The structure and composition of a family in Cotignola during the Eighteenth Century was marked by the lack of privacy, due to a multigenerational family life, with a codified and accepted hierarchical structure and strict rules. In this regime, all women were almost treated as minors and wives were always under marital authority. Paradoxically, what for a woman was the only form of emancipation from paternal authority – that is to say, marriage – gave rise to a new submission, the one to the husband. It was unavoidable, therefore, that from her first admission to the new family after her marriage, the daughter-in-law would have been very far from being able to lead the house, being, in fact, the last arrival and often, as they say, “the last wheel of the wagon” in family’s hierarchy. The entry of the young bride into the new family was accompanied by the mother-in-law’s ritual, who welcomed the daughter-in-law "on the stairs with a big spoon", offered as assignment of domestic chores. For a woman who wanted to compete with men in Romagna, there is a name that still exists, which is “Árzdora”: a woman who wants to go beyond assigned functions in a patriarchal society and show her skills by competing with her husband. Many special thanks to @federico.settembrini and to all Cotignola neighbors for their hospitality. xx

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Reus, Spain 2018 for Womart Project curated by @Rebobinart This wall is part of Womart project, a project that aims to claim the need to recognize female talent in the visual arts in general and in urban art The painters and sculptors have been systematically presented in the art history manuals in a marginal, almost anecdotal way, which could make us think that their existence has been practically nil. While it is true that great female talents have existed throughout history, their recognition has often been eclipsed by their male colleagues. The background of this invisibility is found in a set of reasons that have made obviate the women of the artistic panorama for centuries. The image represents a woman getting rid of a blanket. The folds of the fabric refer to the complex, the far-fetched, the weight and the burden of history, of the lived. In this case the woman is freed from all this, leading to discovery and visibility. Many special thanks to Miriam Alarcon and everyone involved in this project. xx

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At night time… Requena, Spain 2018.

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¨Una donna libera¨ Ragusa, Sicily 2016 for FestiWall ( pic by Marcello Bocchieri ) This wall pays tribute to Maria Ochipinti ( 1921-1996 ) militant pacifist, anarchist, feminist, a woman who can be´hardly labeled, recorded in Sicilian history as an emblem of Sicilian women’s protest in the mid-forties. Maria Occhipinti's life has not been easy, her quest for freedom and struggle against all kinds of injustice forced her to be uprooted, to move like a nomad without a home. A life full of pain and loneliness, a woman who, by her way of thinking, was marginalized by her people, one of the reasons why she had to live her life in exile. The journey was for her a way to affirm her own freedom, to revolt against bourgeois normality. Maria was a woman who always remained firm in her convictions, sacrificing her life for ideas that went beyond herself, it is her humanity that always prevails in all her actions. This wall speaks of her passion, her freedom and greatness, but it also represents the incomprehension, abuse and marginalization she had to live with all her life. Many special thanks to Antonio Sortino and Vincenzo Cascone for all the love and care. Thanks to Ciccio Ficili for his help and great company. Thanks to Maria Occhipinti family and to all Ragusa neighbords for their support and hospitality. (more images www.hyuro.es)

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(h/t) designboom.com